Across the Rolling River by Celia Wilkins

Across the Rolling River, by Celia Wilkins, was published in 2001 by HarperCollins. It is the sequel to On Top of Concord Hill.

Rating: 3/5

Perhaps it’s because I read them too far apart, or the author tried very hard to make a smooth transition, but I couldn’t really tell that a different author had written Across the Rolling River. There were a few things that felt slightly off, but not enough for me to really be jarred by the change in style.

Across the Rolling River introduces Charles Ingalls and his family to the series, and young Charlie is just as boisterous and expressive as Pa Ingalls from the Little House books. It also shows us his family, who end up so close to the Quiner family (there are three Quiner/Ingalls marriages in total: Caroline, Henry, and Eliza marry Charles, Polly, and Peter respectively). Also appearing in this book are Mr. Carpenter and his son Charlie (who marries Martha eventually), who haven’t appeared since the third book, Little Clearing in the Woods.

This book really is starting to accelerate Caroline’s development and love of learning. We see her desire to be a schoolteacher, with the influence of her teacher, Miss May, as well as her budding attraction to Charles Ingalls (though she’s only 12 in this book). We also see the pearl-handled pen of the Little House books, as this book details how Caroline came to get it.

I didn’t feel this book was as exciting or interesting as On Top of Concord Hill, but I liked the introduction of the Ingalls family as well as the exploration of Caroline’s desires and wishes. The author switch seemed smooth, which can be hard to accomplish even for a children’s book. All in all, not my favorite Caroline book, but one that sets up a lot of things for the next two books.

Recommended Age Range: 8+

Warnings: None.

Genre: Children’s, Historical Fiction

You can buy this book here: https://amzn.to/2KAIv8d

On Top of Concord Hill by Maria D. Wilkes

On Top of Concord Hill, by Maria D. Wilkes, was published in 2000 by HarperCollins. It is the sequel to Little Clearing in the Woods.

Rating: 3/5

As I hoped, once the Quiner family moved to Concord, the books started to get more interesting and memorable. In On Top of Concord Hill, the last book Wilkes will write of this series, a stepfather, the Gold Rush, cholera, and early frost all combine to create perhaps the most tension-filled book in the series so far. Of course, it’s still very tame tension, but it’s much better than what has been in the first three books.

This is also the first book that was written after the start of the Martha Years, which might explain why suddenly Caroline’s grandparents are mentioned more and why the cover has changed more and more to express similarity between the sets of books.

The thing I most enjoyed about this book was the subtle, lovely hints we got at the Charlotte/Frederick Holbrook relationship. I’m not sure whether in real life Charlotte married him for stability or love, but in this book, it’s very sweet to see the way they interact with each other. I am a huge fan of shy/quiet guy-marries-girl tropes, so perhaps that’s why this book so far is my favorite of all the Caroline books (though there wasn’t much competition, to be honest).

With an author change and the introduction of the Ingalls family in the next book, it will be interesting to see if the Caroline books will continue to improve or if the changes will be too jarring. I remember quite liking the last book in the series, so I’m hopeful that the change won’t shake things up too badly (or perhaps they will shake them up in a good way!).

Recommended Age Range: 8+

Warnings: None.

Genre: Children’s, Historical Fiction

You can buy this book here: https://amzn.to/2XNxIQ0

Little Clearing in the Woods by Maria D. Wilkes

Little Clearing in the Woods, by Maria D. Wilkes, was published in 1998 by HarperCollins. It is the sequel to Little Town at the Crossroads.

Rating: 3/5

Little Clearing in the Woods finally starts to lift the Caroline books out of the pit of mediocrity they were sinking into. The family moving, the hardships they face on the new land, the new people they meet—all combine to form, if not a particularly dramatic book, at least enough tension to generate some excitement and interest.

The first half of the book has some overly dramatic conflict with wolves, delivered a bit clunkily, but once the family reaches their new home, it settles down to a more realistic conflict as the family struggles to get used to new surroundings. Caroline and Martha have a few spats, and I wish Martha was more developed of a character so that the fights would have more meaning instead of feeling so wooden.

The second half of the book is better than the first, with the introduction of Mr. Holbrook. Despite my problems with Wilkes’ writing, I will say that she paints a very good picture of the financial situation of the family. It is very clear that they struggle to put food on the table, and so the kindness of Mr. Holbrook and the generosity of Mr. Kellogg shine through even more.

It’s a shame that the Caroline Years don’t start out quite as strong or interesting as the previous two series, but at last the series seems to be improving. Little Clearing in the Woods still shares some of the problems of the first two books, but the second half promises better things to come.

Recommended Age Range: 8+

Warnings: None.

Genre: Children’s, Historical Fiction

You can buy this book here: https://amzn.to/2XCa2ZV

Little Town at the Crossroads by Maria D. Wilkes

Little Town at the Crossroads, by Maria D. Wilkes, was published in 1997 by HarperCollins. It is the sequel to Little House in Brookfield.

Rating: 2/5

Little Town at the Crossroads is a book that is very similar to Little House in Brookfield, in terms of both content and style. The content is very much like previous Little House books: each chapter is episodic, without a distinct arc beyond the passing of time. Wilkes seems to be trying to convey numerous aspects of the time period without necessarily tying everything together, which isn’t a bad thing. The book does, however, distinctly lack charm and excitement as did the first one.

I loved these books as a kid, but as an adult, they’re definitely missing the mark. Some of my favorite books (that I remember) are later in the series, after there is an author change, so perhaps it’s just Wilkes’s style that I’m struggling with. Everything is too cut-and-dry; characters sound like they’re rehearsing lines. There’s no real voice to them beyond “Caroline is the neat one, Martha is the spunky one.”

As historical fiction, Little Town at the Crossroads does a good job of capturing life in the 1840s. However, as a story, it’s lacking a theme to tie it together and some excitement and charm. Everything is just a bit too wooden and similar, and the characters don’t grow or change. I’m hoping that changes as the series goes on. 

Recommended Age Range: 8+

Warnings: None.

Genre: Children’s, Historical Fiction

You can buy this book here: https://amzn.to/2XrkUuq

Little House in Brookfield by Maria D. Wilkes

Little House in Brookfield, by Maria D. Wilkes, was published in 1996 by HarperCollins.

Rating: 3/5

The Caroline Years, or, as my copy states, “The Brookfield Years,” were written before the Martha Years and the Charlotte Years. Having read the latter two first, which were written by a different author, the style of this one threw me off a bit, especially since the Charlotte is this book is so much different. I’d say that Wilkes is likely more historically accurate than Wiley in her portrayal, however, especially since she had more research from which to draw.

I’ve always enjoyed the Caroline Years the most, probably because it spans the most amount of years, similarly to the original Little House books. However, the beginning of the series is mediocre at best. While it does a good job of depicting the struggles the family went through after the death of their father, it’s simply not a very exciting book. It does give glimmers into the personality of Caroline that we will see come out in the Little House books, and I also enjoyed the farm life aspect it showed, as it does a good job of explaining so that readers know how people did things back then.

I remember enjoying the Caroline Years more as the books went on, especially once they move to Concord, but Little House in Brookfield gives the series a slow start. Both the style and the voice threw me off, as I was used to that of the previous two series, though that’s not necessarily the book’s fault (although I’m not fond of that sort of style in general). There’s also a lack of excitement that makes the book a little dry to read.

Recommended Age Range: 8+

Warnings: None.

Genre: Children’s, Historical Fiction

You can buy this book here: https://amzn.to/2MflfPS