The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, by Mark Haddon, was published in 2003 by Doubleday.

Christopher John Francis Boone knows all the countries of the world and their capitals and every prime number up to 7,057. He relates well to animals but has no understanding of human emotions. He cannot stand to be touched. Although gifted with a superbly logical brain, Christopher is autistic. Everyday interactions and admonishments have little meaning for him. Routine, order, and predictability shelter him from the messy wider world. Then, at fifteen, Christopher’s carefully constructed world falls apart when he finds his neighbor’s dog, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork, and he is initially blamed for the killing. Christopher decides that he will track down the real killer and turns to his favorite fictional character, the impeccably logical Sherlock Holmes, for inspiration. But the investigation leads him down some unexpected paths and ultimately brings him face to face with the dissolution of his parents’ marriage. As he tries to deal with the crisis within his own family, we are drawn into the workings of Christopher’s mind.

Rating: 4/5

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is a superbly written book that shines a light on the inner workings of an autistic mind. Despite the fact that Christopher cannot comprehend human emotion, the reader can, and so the reader experiences the emotions that Christopher struggles with—the desperation of his father, the annoyance of the police, the at-times-rude-but-at-times-caring strangers.

Haddon’s style of writing perfectly matches Christopher’s personality. We get the matter-of-fact, the confusion, and the excitement communicated through sentence structure and style. It’s rather fabulous, really.

Basically, the book is both heartwarming and heartbreaking, The mystery is well-done and realistic, Christopher’s confusion and desperation at the end of the novel are incredibly well communicated, as are the emotions of his father, and it’s hard to put this book down. My only squabble with the book is that I could have done with less swearing and I thoroughly disagreed with Christopher on many things.

Recommended Age Range: 14+

Warnings: Swearing.

Genre: Young Adult

He said, “I have spoken to your father and he says that you didn’t mean to hit the policeman.”

I didn’t say anything because this wasn’t a question.

He said, “Did you mean to hit the policeman?”

I said, “Yes.”

He squeezed his face and said, “But you didn’t mean to hurt the policeman?”

I thought about this and said, “No. I didn’t mean to hurt the policeman. I just wanted him to stop touching me.”

You can buy this book here: http://amzn.to/2Eqd1zl

One thought on “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

  1. Pingback: The Goldfish Boy by Lisa Thompson | Leaf's Reviews

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